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Bundle: Various clones of Heliamphora minor var. pilosa
A nice selection of different Heliamphora minor var. pilosa types at a reduced set price.Contains my 3 best clones - clone 1, 2 and 3!!!

From €215.00*
New
Heliamphora 'Cyclops'
A very impressive and well-known variety by the late Andy Smith,this cross is known for its extremely pronounced lids .

€75.00*
Short supply (FAQ)
Heliamphora "Black Cherry"
A very beautyful hybrid or a mutant of Heliamphora heterodoxa?This originates from H. heterodoxa seeds that possibly were cross pollinated with something else from my greenhouse by an insect?I consider to register it as Heliamphora "Black Cherry"The lids are almost black and glossy!Very nice!

€50.00*
Short supply (FAQ)
Heliamphora "Godzilla" x parva (Extremely Hairy)
A cross between one of the best clones of Heliamphora parva and Heliamphora "Godzilla" known to me!Only a few single clones of the preselection available.

€75.00*
Short supply (FAQ)
Heliamphora "Mickey"
Most likely a natural hybrid of Heliamphora ionasi and Heliamphora elongata. Very beautiful selected clone with very prominet lid.

€20.00*
Heliamphora "Peter Pan"
Absolutely stunning and unique plant!A mutation that does not form adult pitchers. The largest juvenile plant I had so far was 40 cm in diameter and was flowering from the juvenile rosette!!!Only very few flowering size plants are available that were propagated by division from the mother plant. First come - first serve!

€30.00*
Short supply (FAQ)
Heliamphora "Spiderweb"
A selected clone of Heliamphora chimantensis x pulchella. It's notable for its red veins forming a pattern that is reminiscent of a spiderweb. I plan to register this plant as a cultivar - Heliamphora "Spiderweb"Only very few divisions are available.

€40.00*
Short supply (FAQ)
Heliamphora (heterodoxa x ionasi) x minor var. pilosa (02)
Single seedlings, Individual clones.All of them already have adult leaves! As with all multi-hybrids, there is quite a bit of variation. I will keep about 5 of my favorite clones for further breeding and vegetative propagation in the future, but most clones are unique specimens that are not reproduced in vitro. Once they are gone, they are gone!

€40.00*
Heliamphora chimantensis (Chimanta, Venezuela)
Easy, fast growing, and readily clumping species from the Chimanta Massif in Venezuela. Heliamphora chimantensis grows at elevations of 1900-2100 meters and is known from the top of the Chimanta and Apacara Tepui where it grows in open, poorly drained areas among sparse vegetation. It is noted for forming huge colonies of many individuals tightly packed in a matt that often exceed several meters in width and are the result of natural division over time rather than seeding. The shape of the pitchers is upright and the color is yellowish green turning red at maturity. A large V shape slit is present at the front that aids with drainage. The nectar spoon is near vertical and bright red with irregularly shaped nectar gland patches. It is said in habitat the plants produce so much nectar that their scent can be detected from a few meters away. Although wild specimen can reach 50cm high and a single colony can be as wide as 6 meters, in cultivations plants stay much smaller, rarely attaining more than 20cm in height and remaining manageable in width. Highly recommended for beginners, and truly a joy as it matures into a sizable clump. (Wistuba, A T Carow & P Harbarth, 2002)

From €25.00*
Heliamphora ciliata (Lowland)
Ever heard of a lowland Heliamphora? Meet Heliamphora ciliata! It is the only Heliamphora known exclusively from sub-montane regions. Found in a few swampy meadows north-east of Aprada Tepui in the Gran Sabana at elevation of around 900m, this species grows in permanently moist to inundated soils among low growing vegetation. The name ciliata refers to the tufts of hairs on the back of the nectar spoon and along the back of the pitcher mid-rib. The interior of the pitchers is also lined in two distinctive types of hairs, a shorter and a longer one, that contribute to the overall hairy look of the plant. Pitchers easily color red in bright light and are noted for not having a drainage hole. Instead a narrow slit is present at the front of the pitcher which regulates water level in a manner similar to chimantensis, minor, and pulchella which are closely related. The oval spoon comes off a triangular neck and is typically held at a 45 degree angle above the pitcher opening. Small colonies of ciliata up to 35cm in width can be found in habitat, and similarly the plant readily clumps in cultivation, forming attractive mounds over time. Although it can reach 20cm height in nature, it is usually shorter in cultivation. This easy, fast growing, temperature tolerant species comes highly recommended. Excellent beginner plant! (Wistuba, Nerz & A. Fleischm. 2009)

€40.00*
Heliamphora collina (Foothills Testigos)
Heliamphora collina (Foothills Testigos)Nicknamed “The Little Folliculata” this wonderful species is a great choice for people who like the overall look of folliculata but prefer plants that are more compact. Growing at the foothills of the Lost Testigos Massif, neighboring hills and lower tepuis, and possibly at the base of Ptari Tepui, collina is fairly wide spread at elevations of 1700-1825m. The name refers to the species preference for colline (or hilly) habitat where it grows in wet substrate and favors seepage sites among low growing but dense vegetation. Sometimes the plant can be completely covered in moss or leaf litter with only the wide circular pitcher opening visible. The pitchers are a pale yellow green and look similar to folliculata though they are smaller, less cylindrical, and produce a nectar spoon that does not form a chamber. Drainage hole is present at the mid-section. In habitat collina pitchers can be up to 25cm in length, but in cultivations the plants remain smaller, typically up to 15-18cm at the most. They clump easily producing attractive rosettes which are more upright than folliculata. This easy, compact, and forgiving species should be in every collection. Recommended for beginners! (Wistuba, Nerz, S McPherson, A. Fleishm. 2011)

€30.00*
Short supply (FAQ)
Heliamphora electrum
Heliamphora electrum is a new species described in 2024. It occurs in the Sierra La Lema, among others on the Venamo Tepui and Cerro Uei at relatively low altitudes of 1100 to 1400 metres ASL.It is characterised by bristles in two size classes, as is also known for Heliamphora minor var. pilosa and Heliamphora ionasi. The larger hairs tend to be yellowish in colour, while the smaller hairs have a whitish sheen. The epithet "electrum" refers to the naturally occurring alloy of gold and silver to reflect the play of colours.

€40.00*
Heliamphora exappendiculata (Amuri Tepui)
A fantastic, wide-spread species from the Chimanta Massif and Aprada and Araopan Tepui. The name of the species refers to its lack of a nectar spoon, instead the leaf has a recessed bubble-like structure at the tip that holds the nectaries. Very cool! Heliamphora exappendiculata is found at elevations between 1700-2100m and is most abundant in cliff side habitats where the plants grow directly attached to permanently moist surfaces at seepage sites and by streams and waterfalls. In these situations the pitchers tend to grow upturned on a short scrambling rhizome with a skirt of dead foliage hanging down. It is one of the few taxa in the genus that appears to favor shaded conditions such as gullies, gorges, and canyons, though it is also found in brighter, more exposed locations often among shrubby vegetation. Therefore, color can vary dramatically between a pale green or buttery yellow often suffused with pinks and reds in partial light, to a vibrant peach color and even pure red in full sun. The wide pitcher opening serves a dual purpose of acting as a landing zone for potential insect pray, but also for collecting various organic debris which may serve as a secondary source of nutrients. Both in nature and cultivation, H. exappendiculata can vary in size. Some clones remain fairly compact while others can reach as tall as 35cm (though usually no more than 25cm). This is a fast growing, readily offsetting species that is easy to care for and can often be grown in lower light than typical of the genus. The numerous selections available make acquiring different clones both worthwhile and fun! A must for a well-rounded Heliamphora collection! (Nerz & Wistuba 2006)

€40.00*
Heliamphora exappendiculata (Apacapa)
A very beautiful form of Apacapa Tepui.The plants are smaller than other origins and densely hairy on the outside of the pitcher.

€50.00*
Heliamphora exappendiculata Araopan x pulchella Araopan
Beautiful selected clone of the hybrid. The plants grow very large and show the typical spreading pitchers of Heliamphora exappndiculata - but with a rudimentary "lid".

€30.00*
Heliamphora folliculata (Aparaman Tepui, Ven.)
One of the most recognizable species of Heliamphora because of its large tubular pitchers and unusual spoon that contains a hallow chamber for storing nectar. Found on top of the Los Testigos chain of tepuis at elevations of 1700-2400m, this Heliamphora braves the elements in the mutual shelter of dense scrub vegetation. It prefers permanently wet surfaces such as seepage sites and near waterfalls in sunny and exposed areas. The pitchers are long and tubular with a minimal narrowing at the waist where a drainage hole is present to regulate the water contained within. In cross section, the leaves are often kidney shaped. The unique concave spoon emerges directly from the back of the pitcher with the front extended over the pitcher opening, while a hallow chamber is present at the back and serves to store nectar. The color is golden yellow in young leaves suffusing to a uniform orange, pink, and red in mature ones. The foliage is typically held at an acute angle up to 45 degrees and often rests on surrounding vegetation but plants have the same growth habit even when no such vegetation is present. It is believed that this is an adaptation to keep the center of the rosette exposed to sunlight and free of competing vegetation. In cultivation this means the plants need a good amount of room to spread horizontally and should not be kept too close to other specimen in the collection. Though folliculata is said to reach no more than 30cm in nature, that size can be easily attained by some clones in cultivation and plants do get much wider as they clump, making this species one of the most robust. Easy to care for, vibrantly colored, and fast growing, this Heliamphora is great for beginners, though its growth habit means a good amount of room should be provided. (Wistuba, A., P. Harbarth & T. Carow, 2001)

From €75.00*
New
Short supply (FAQ)
Heliamphora folliculata (Kamakawarai Tepui, Ven.)
One of the most recognizable species of Heliamphora because of its large tubular pitchers and unusual spoon that contains a hallow chamber for storing nectar. Found on top of the Los Testigos chain of tepuis at elevations of 1700-2400m, this Heliamphora braves the elements in the mutual shelter of dense scrub vegetation. It prefers permanently wet surfaces such as seepage sites and near waterfalls in sunny and exposed areas. The pitchers are long and tubular with a minimal narrowing at the waist where a drainage hole is present to regulate the water contained within. In cross section, the leaves are often kidney shaped. The unique concave spoon emerges directly from the back of the pitcher with the front extended over the pitcher opening, while a hallow chamber is present at the back and serves to store nectar. The color is golden yellow in young leaves suffusing to a uniform orange, pink, and red in mature ones. The foliage is typically held at an acute angle up to 45 degrees and often rests on surrounding vegetation but plants have the same growth habit even when no such vegetation is present. It is believed that this is an adaptation to keep the center of the rosette exposed to sunlight and free of competing vegetation. In cultivation this means the plants need a good amount of room to spread horizontally and should not be kept too close to other specimen in the collection. Though folliculata is said to reach no more than 30cm in nature, that size can be easily attained by some clones in cultivation and plants do get much wider as they clump, making this species one of the most robust. Easy to care for, vibrantly colored, and fast growing, this Heliamphora is great for beginners, though its growth habit means a good amount of room should be provided. (Wistuba, A., P. Harbarth & T. Carow, 2001)

€75.00*
Heliamphora folliculata (Murosipan Tepui, Ven.)
One of the most recognizable species of Heliamphora because of its large tubular pitchers and unusual spoon that contains a hallow chamber for storing nectar. Found on top of the Los Testigos chain of tepuis at elevations of 1700-2400m, this Heliamphora braves the elements in the mutual shelter of dense scrub vegetation. It prefers permanently wet surfaces such as seepage sites and near waterfalls in sunny and exposed areas. The pitchers are long and tubular with a minimal narrowing at the waist where a drainage hole is present to regulate the water contained within. In cross section, the leaves are often kidney shaped. The unique concave spoon emerges directly from the back of the pitcher with the front extended over the pitcher opening, while a hallow chamber is present at the back and serves to store nectar. The color is golden yellow in young leaves suffusing to a uniform orange, pink, and red in mature ones. The foliage is typically held at an acute angle up to 45 degrees and often rests on surrounding vegetation but plants have the same growth habit even when no such vegetation is present. It is believed that this is an adaptation to keep the center of the rosette exposed to sunlight and free of competing vegetation. In cultivation this means the plants need a good amount of room to spread horizontally and should not be kept too close to other specimen in the collection. Though folliculata is said to reach no more than 30cm in nature, that size can be easily attained by some clones in cultivation and plants do get much wider as they clump, making this species one of the most robust. Easy to care for, vibrantly colored, and fast growing, this Heliamphora is great for beginners, though its growth habit means a good amount of room should be provided. (Wistuba, A., P. Harbarth & T. Carow, 2001)

€40.00*
Short supply (FAQ)
Heliamphora folliculata Kam. x ionasi (small)
Individual seedlings - not from tissue culture propagation! Only very few for sale.

€60.00*
Heliamphora heterodoxa x ionasii
Very impressive hybrid. Maybe the best hybrid I know. Gets really huge!It is so easy that some collectors keep it in the bog bed over the summer or keep it completely without special protection between sarracenias on balcony or terrace.The perfect starter plant!

€20.00*
Heliamphora huberi (Amuri Tepui)
Little known, though widely distributed, Heliamphora huberi is endemic to the Chimanta Massif and is present on several of the tepuis and associated areas. The name honors Dr. Otto Huber, a botanist who has contributed greatly to the knowledge of tepui flora, and who collected the type specimen on Angassima Tepui in 1986. Heliamphora huberi grows in partially shaded habitat among dense low-growing vegetation at elevation between 1850-2200m. The plants tend to form small clusters of offshoots up to 40cm across that are often scattered, though large strands are also found on Akopan Tepui. The distinctive feature of this species is its oval nectar spoon that comes off a short neck-like elongation at the back of the pitcher and has a pronounced upturned appendage at the tip. The pitchers themselves are up to 30cm tall in the wild (though much smaller in cultivation) and their morphology suggest a hybridogenic origin between a species akin to H. heterodoxa and perhaps pulchella. Very interesting! Their color is a pale green which suffuses to red or purple towards the margins, with faint red or purple veining in the interior. When exposed to more light and as the pitchers mature they often become redder. This wonderful species deserves to be grown more widely. Though not a fast grower, it’s a beautiful addition to the collection with its curiously shaped spoons. A mature plant can look very striking.(Fleischmann, A., A. Wistuba & J. Nerz, 2009)

€30.00*