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Winterpause! Alle neuen Bestellungen werden auf März 2023 terminiert! Ab Dezember werden wir neue Bestände in den Webshop einpflegen.
Winter break! All new orders will be scheduled for March 2023. We will start to update the shop inventory in December.

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Short supply (FAQ)
Heliamphora "Godzilla"
The name says it all!This cultivar is monstrous to say at least. Easily by far the biggest Heliamphora I have ever seen and I've seen and grown quite a lot!Young plants of this unique cultivar are available. Some with juvenile leaves and a few with first adult ones. Very limited. First come first serve!

From €75.00*
Short supply (FAQ)
Heliamphora "Mickey"
Most likely a natural hybrid of Heliamphora ionasi and Heliamphora elongata. Very beautiful selected clone with very prominet lid.

From €40.00*
Short supply (FAQ)
Currently only 1 available
Heliamphora exappendiculata Araopan x pulchella Araopan
Beautiful selected clone of the hybrid. The plants grow very large and show the typical spreading pitchers of Heliamphora exappndiculata - but with a rudimentary "lid".

From €30.00*
Short supply (FAQ)
Currently only 2 available
Heliamphora folliculata Kam. x ionasi (small)
Individual seedlings - not from tissue culture propagation! Only very few for sale.

€100.00*
Short supply (FAQ)
Currently only 4 available
Heliamphora hispida (Cerro Neblina, Venezuela)
An excellent choice for growers who like compact Heliamphora! These plants rarely get more than 15cm tall! The name comes from the Latin word for “bristly” and refers to the coarse hairs that line the interior of the pitchers. Very cool. The full range of the species is largely unknown due to the remoteness and inaccessibility of its habitat, however, it has been recorded from altitudes of 1800-3014m in and around the Neblina Massif, representing some of the highest known populations of Heliamphora. It grows in shady, shrubby bogs at seepage sites, among leaf litter, in permanently wet and often inundated soils. In fact, at times the surrounding water level may be virtually the same as that of the fluid contained within. The plants are locally abundant and are the dominant Heliamphora species where present. They form large hummock like colonies that can become massive with age. In one case, a colony was observed that measured 180cm in height and comprised entirely of old foliage and dead rhizomes completely overgrown by living plants! The pitchers are funnel shaped often with a wide oval opening pointed front to back. As noted, the interior is lined with stiff, coarse, downward facing hairs up to 4mm long. The spoon is bright red, generally held at a 45 degree angle over the pitcher opening, and has a distinctive point at the tip. A drainage hole is present at the waist, which distinguishes this species from similar species such as H. pulchella and H. minor. Fantastic choice and easy to accommodate in any collection due to its small size. (Nerz, J. & A. Wistuba, 2000)

From €15.00*
Heliamphora huberi (Amuri Tepui)
Little known, though widely distributed, Heliamphora huberi is endemic to the Chimanta Massif and is present on several of the tepuis and associated areas. The name honors Dr. Otto Huber, a botanist who has contributed greatly to the knowledge of tepui flora, and who collected the type specimen on Angassima Tepui in 1986. Heliamphora huberi grows in partially shaded habitat among dense low-growing vegetation at elevation between 1850-2200m. The plants tend to form small clusters of offshoots up to 40cm across that are often scattered, though large strands are also found on Akopan Tepui. The distinctive feature of this species is its oval nectar spoon that comes off a short neck-like elongation at the back of the pitcher and has a pronounced upturned appendage at the tip. The pitchers themselves are up to 30cm tall in the wild (though much smaller in cultivation) and their morphology suggest a hybridogenic origin between a species akin to H. heterodoxa and perhaps pulchella. Very interesting! Their color is a pale green which suffuses to red or purple towards the margins, with faint red or purple veining in the interior. When exposed to more light and as the pitchers mature they often become redder. This wonderful species deserves to be grown more widely. Though not a fast grower, it’s a beautiful addition to the collection with its curiously shaped spoons. A mature plant can look very striking.(Fleischmann, A., A. Wistuba & J. Nerz, 2009)

€40.00*
Heliamphora huberi (Angasima Tepui)
Little known, though widely distributed, Heliamphora huberi is endemic to the Chimanta Massif and is present on several of the tepuis and associated areas. The name honors Dr. Otto Huber, a botanist who has contributed greatly to the knowledge of tepui flora, and who collected the type specimen on Angassima Tepui in 1986. Heliamphora huberi grows in partially shaded habitat among dense low-growing vegetation at elevation between 1850-2200m. The plants tend to form small clusters of offshoots up to 40cm across that are often scattered, though large strands are also found on Akopan Tepui. The distinctive feature of this species is its oval nectar spoon that comes off a short neck-like elongation at the back of the pitcher and has a pronounced upturned appendage at the tip. The pitchers themselves are up to 30cm tall in the wild (though much smaller in cultivation) and their morphology suggest a hybridogenic origin between a species akin to H. heterodoxa and perhaps pulchella. Very interesting! Their color is a pale green which suffuses to red or purple towards the margins, with faint red or purple veining in the interior. When exposed to more light and as the pitchers mature they often become redder. This wonderful species deserves to be grown more widely. Though not a fast grower, it’s a beautiful addition to the collection with its curiously shaped spoons. A mature plant can look very striking.Plants from Angasima Tepui are much redder than the ones from Amuri.(Fleischmann, A., A. Wistuba & J. Nerz, 2009)

From €40.00*
Heliamphora huberi (Angasima) x folliculata Aparaman
Heliamphora huberi hybrids are often characterized by intense dark red tones. The cross with Heliamphora folliculata promises vigor and an interesting pitcher shape.

€30.00*
Heliamphora ionasi "Zappergeck"
This has become one my favorite clones of Heliamphora ionasi in recent times!I plan to register this awsome selection and name it after a funny character from the "Augsburger Puppenkiste", a famous German puppet theater that was very popular in the 1970s. Zappergeck is a little dragon-like reptile from the "Cat with the hat" series that enjoyed relaxing with the mouth wide open to let the sun shine right into it - just as this clone of Heliamphora ionasi.It stays smaller than other clones, is notable for its more greenish-golden tint that nicely contrasts with the big deep red lids. Pitcher mouths are quite expanded and flat - just like open mouths.I only have very few divisions with adult pitchers available at the moment but several juvenile plants.

From €20.00*
Heliamphora ionasi (Ilu Tepui, Venezuela)
Truly one of the most magnificent members of the genus and one of the biggest! Though often slow growing, H. ionasi is worth the wait, and a fully mature plant can be the crown jewel of the Heliamphora collection. The name commemorates Jonah Boyan, a member of Maguires’ expedition that led to the discovery of the species, and represents his Latinized first name. The known range of the species is between 1800-2600m in the area between Ilu and Tramen Tepui in Venezuela. The plants are most abundant in open boggy clearings along the sides of the Ilu-Tramen valley, though they can also compete successfully with the dense vegetation of the cloud forest floor, and even grow directly on permanently wet cliff sides in a manner similar to H. exappendiculata and H. uncinata. Pitcher size varies greatly depending on habitat- some are only 20-30cm in length, while others can be up to 50cm long and 18cm wide! The pitcher opening is exceptionally wide and often circular. This may serve the dual purpose of trapping pray and collecting organic debris as an additional source of nutrients. In some cases, the opening is the only part of the plant that is visible above the surrounding vegetation. The pitchers are typically held at an acute angle away from the apex, which might help keep the growth point exposed to light. In cultivation this means the plants like to sprawl, so ample space should be provided. Long downward facing hairs up to 11mm (longest in the genus) line the pitcher interior. They come off distinctive bumps which can be used to positively identify the species from hybrids with H. elongata and H. arenicola. A drainage hole is present at the narrow waist. Pitcher color is typically a vibrant peach suffused with pinks and reds even in lower light (though they can be completely red or green too). The nectar spoon is red, oval, and can be variously angled towards or away from the opening. Although this has never been observed in nature, Heliamphora ionasi pitcher are certainly voluminous enough to potentially trap rodent pray! These majestic, brightly colored, and elegantly shaped plants are a must for any serious collector of the genus. (Maguire, B., 1978)

From €40.00*
Short supply (FAQ)
Heliamphora ionasi (Red Giant) x minor v. pilosa (clone 2)
H. ionasi (Red Giant - Killer) x minor var. pilosa (clone 2) - Selected clonesAbsolutely stunning!

From €50.00*
Small Batch Release
Heliamphora ionasi (Red Giant) x minor v. pilosa (MSG)
H. ionasi (Red Giant - Killer) x minor var. pilosa (MS-Giant)Extremely impressive red colouration!

From €50.00*
Heliamphora minor "Selection 4"
A staple for growers who like compact Heliamphora, H. minor is one of the most widely cultivated species. Though different clones can vary significantly in their growth rate, color, and overall size, the plants always stay manageable and easily fit into every collection. Unevenly distributed on the summits of Auyan Tepui (at 1900-2500m) and the much smaller Cerro la Luna (as low as 1650m), this species favors mixed plant communities which enjoy mutual shelter from the elements. In these situations, H. minor can form tightly packed hummocks up to 1m across. The soil in which the plants grow is frequently inundated and at times the water level on the outside and the inside of the pitchers is virtually the same. Pitchers are typically up to 15cm tall and do not have a drainage hole (instead a narrow slit extends down to the mid-sections and regulated the water within). The spoons are generally oval and held at a 45 degree angle above the pitcher opening on a narrow neck. Two subspecies are recognized: H. minor v minor and H. minor v pilosa. The latter is distinguished by its dense cover of long hairs both on the exterior and the interior of the pitchers, giving it an overall fuzzy look. No intermediate forms have been observed between the two subspecies even though strands can often grow in close proximity. Heliamphora minor is an extremely variable species. Please refer to specific clone information for details. Because there are many selections available, it is very much worthwhile to grow different clones, especially if small Heliamphora are favored. (Gleason, H. A. & E. P. Killip, 1939) A very nice selected clone. Reddish on the outside, greenish on the inside of pitchers.

€40.00*
Heliamphora minor (Auyan Tepui, Venezuela)
A staple for growers who like compact Heliamphora, H. minor is one of the most widely cultivated species. Though different clones can vary significantly in their growth rate, color, and overall size, the plants always stay manageable and easily fit into every collection. Unevenly distributed on the summits of Auyan Tepui (at 1900-2500m) and the much smaller Cerro la Luna (as low as 1650m), this species favors mixed plant communities which enjoy mutual shelter from the elements. In these situations, H. minor can form tightly packed hummocks up to 1m across. The soil in which the plants grow is frequently inundated and at times the water level on the outside and the inside of the pitchers is virtually the same. Pitchers are typically up to 15cm tall and do not have a drainage hole (instead a narrow slit extends down to the mid-sections and regulated the water within). The spoons are generally oval and held at a 45 degree angle above the pitcher opening on a narrow neck. Two subspecies are recognized: H. minor v minor and H. minor v pilosa. The latter is distinguished by its dense cover of long hairs both on the exterior and the interior of the pitchers, giving it an overall fuzzy look. No intermediate forms have been observed between the two subspecies even though strands can often grow in close proximity. Heliamphora minor is an extremely variable species. Please refer to specific clone information for details. Because there are many selections available, it is very much worthwhile to grow different clones, especially if small Heliamphora are favored. (Gleason, H. A. & E. P. Killip, 1939)

From €10.00*
Short supply (FAQ)
Heliamphora minor var. pilosa (Auyan) - MS-Giant
As most Heliamphoras this species needs lots of light, cool nights and does not like permanent misting. The plants can be grown in various peaty mixes, however many growers prefer pure living Shagnum-moss. In recent times dead Sphagnum of very high quality from Chile and New-Zealand became widely available. A mix of such moss with horticultural-grade Perlite, a bit of good quality peat-moss and pinebark-choppings makes an excellent mix. However, when using Sphagnum-moss, it’s important to allow for a good drainage as otherwise, Sphagnum has the tendency to rot quickly. Please note, that all Heliamphoras require good illumination. They can, however easily be grown indoors under fluorescent tubes as long as they are close to the lights and temparature requirements can be met. Many growers in fact prefer to grow them in terrariums under fluorescent tubes from cultivatiing Heliamphora in the greenhouse.

From €100.00*
Short supply (FAQ)
Heliamphora minor var. pilosa (Auyan) - various clones
As most Heliamphoras this species needs lots of light, cool nights and does not like permanent misting. The plants can be grown in various peaty mixes, however many growers prefer pure living Shagnum-moss. In recent times dead Sphagnum of very high quality from Chile and New-Zealand became widely available. A mix of such moss with horticultural-grade Perlite, a bit of good quality peat-moss and pinebark-choppings makes an excellent mix. However, when using Sphagnum-moss, it’s important to allow for a good drainage as otherwise, Sphagnum has the tendency to rot quickly. Please note, that all Heliamphoras require good illumination. They can, however easily be grown indoors under fluorescent tubes as long as they are close to the lights and temparature requirements can be met. Many growers in fact prefer to grow them in terrariums under fluorescent tubes from cultivatiing Heliamphora in the greenhouse.

From €80.00*
Heliamphora nutans (Giant Form) - Mericlone
Easy, vigorous, and much bigger than typical H. nutans!is not really clear where these plants originate. They were grown in the Oxford Botanical Garden (UK) for decades but apparently nobody knows where the mother plants were collected. Nowadays, it is believed that Heliamphora nutans "Giant" is in fact a natural hybrid of H. glabra and H. nutans, and so, it is no surprise that the offspring does not come true from seed. In habitat, this hybrid is locally abundant and, in fact, it often outnumbers both parent species in areas where their population converge. So far, it has been found on Mt Roraima, Wei Assipu Tepui, and Maringma Tepui. The mericlone offered is the real thing! It shows exceptional vigor and large size. This is an excellent and beautiful beginner plant. Highly recommended!

From €30.00*
Heliamphora nutans (Kukenan Tepui)
A true staple in Heliamphora culture, and still one of the handsomest plants in the genus. H. nutans was the first species of Heliamphora to be discovered in 1840 and is the generic type. In fact, it would take almost a century before discovering another species and proving the genus was not monotypic! The name refers to the nodding nature of the flowers, and so it’s commonly referred to as The Nodding Pitcher plant. Though Robert Schomburgk found the type in a swampy area at the base of Mount Roraima (which he did not ascend) that population has never been relocated. It is believed a human caused wildfire that swept the area during a particularly dry season in 1926 has completely wiped out any low growing populations of the species. Today, the species is found between 2000-2700m on Meringma, Kukenan, and Yuruani Tepui, as well as Mount Roraima and Roraimita (Wei Assipu Tepui). The plants are most vigorous in mixed plant hummocks in well drained habitats where they form loose clumps up to 35cm across. The pitchers of H. nutans are up to 18cm long and have a mid-height waist with a drainage hole. Their color is typically a blend of muted hues of orange, yellow green, and red suffusing red as they age. The spoon is always red, circular, comparatively small, and has a notch at the front.Hybrids of H. nutans such as H. heterodoxa x nutans and H. glabra x nutans (aka H. nutans “Giant”) are among the easiest and fastest Heliamphora to grow, however, the true species is much slower. Still, this charming, compact, classic Heliamphora makes a lovely addition to the collection. (Bentham, G., 1840) Typical form from Kukenan Tepui

From €10.00*
Heliamphora nutans (Yuruani Tepui)
A true staple in Heliamphora culture, and still one of the handsomest plants in the genus. H. nutans was the first species of Heliamphora to be discovered in 1840 and is the generic type. In fact, it would take almost a century before discovering another species and proving the genus was not monotypic! The name refers to the nodding nature of the flowers, and so it’s commonly referred to as The Nodding Pitcher plant. Though Robert Schomburgk found the type in a swampy area at the base of Mount Roraima (which he did not ascend) that population has never been relocated. It is believed a human caused wildfire that swept the area during a particularly dry season in 1926 has completely wiped out any low growing populations of the species. Today, the species is found between 2000-2700m on Meringma, Kukenan, and Yuruani Tepui, as well as Mount Roraima and Roraimita (Wei Assipu Tepui). The plants are most vigorous in mixed plant hummocks in well drained habitats where they form loose clumps up to 35cm across. The pitchers of H. nutans are up to 18cm long and have a mid-height waist with a drainage hole. Their color is typically a blend of muted hues of orange, yellow green, and red suffusing red as they age. The spoon is always red, circular, comparatively small, and has a notch at the front.Hybrids of H. nutans such as H. heterodoxa x nutans and H. glabra x nutans (aka H. nutans “Giant”) are among the easiest and fastest Heliamphora to grow, however, the true species is much slower. Still, this charming, compact, classic Heliamphora makes a lovely addition to the collection. (Bentham, G., 1840) Heliamphora nutans (Yuruani form) A very nice, stout and almost succulent form of H. nutans.

From €15.00*
Short supply (FAQ)
Currently only 2 available
Heliamphora parva (Cerro Neblina)
Bold, large, red lids held upright over statuesque foliage give Heliamphora parva a striking appearance. Simply beautiful! H. parva was discovered during the initial ascent of the Neblina Massif in 1954, though it was at first considered a subspecies of H. neblinae (the name parva-small refers to its comparatively small size). Additional field studies conducted later revealed significant differences between the two, and in 2011 it was elevated to specific rank. Plants are found at elevations between 1750-2200m in open, upland meadows and clearings with Bonnetia scrub. Pitchers are upright, up to 35cm tall, and have a low to mid-height waist with a drainage hole. They are typically yellow or yellow-green. Sometimes the upper portion of the pitchers has faint red veins on the interior and/or red flashed exterior. A dense covering of small hairs is often present on the outside of the pitchers. A distinguishing feature of the species is its tendency to form a creeping stems up to 70cm long that scrambles over rocks and allow the plant to find new habitat. Very rarely, the stem can be erect. Dead pitchers remain on the stem and effectively collect water which slowly leaks down and allows the plant to survive drought and wildfires that sometimes sweep its habitat. Even if the lead growth is killed during these fires, the plant is usually able to re-sprout from the stem! Ants are also known to colonize the dead pitchers, and- in return for the shelter- protect the living parts by swarming them if they’re disturbed. They also appear able to regularly collect nectar from the spoon and yet rarely get trapped. Fascinating! Curiously Heliamphora parva also has the largest flowers in the genus which is up to 80mm (rarely even more). A real stunner! (Maguire) S. McPherson, A. Fleischm, Wistuba & Nerz, 2011

€75.00*
Short supply (FAQ)
Currently only 1 available
Heliamphora parva 8/02 x "Godzilla
The goal is to combine the pitcher and lid shape of my best clone of Heliamphora parva and the size of Heliamphora "Godzilla".The plants are of course still too small to say the latter. But unfortunately, due to lack of space, I don't have the chance to test all clones for their size potential and have to part with some of them. Your chance!

€75.00*
Heliamphora parva clone 08/02 (Cerro Neblina)
Bold, large, red lids held upright over statuesque foliage give Heliamphora parva a striking appearance. Simply beautiful! H. parva was discovered during the initial ascent of the Neblina Massif in 1954, though it was at first considered a subspecies of H. neblinae (the name parva-small refers to its comparatively small size). Additional field studies conducted later revealed significant differences between the two, and in 2011 it was elevated to specific rank. Plants are found at elevations between 1750-2200m in open, upland meadows and clearings with Bonnetia scrub. Pitchers are upright, up to 35cm tall, and have a low to mid-height waist with a drainage hole. They are typically yellow or yellow-green. Sometimes the upper portion of the pitchers has faint red veins on the interior and/or red flashed exterior. A dense covering of small hairs is often present on the outside of the pitchers. A distinguishing feature of the species is its tendency to form a creeping stems up to 70cm long that scrambles over rocks and allow the plant to find new habitat. Very rarely, the stem can be erect. Dead pitchers remain on the stem and effectively collect water which slowly leaks down and allows the plant to survive drought and wildfires that sometimes sweep its habitat. Even if the lead growth is killed during these fires, the plant is usually able to re-sprout from the stem! Ants are also known to colonize the dead pitchers, and- in return for the shelter- protect the living parts by swarming them if they’re disturbed. They also appear able to regularly collect nectar from the spoon and yet rarely get trapped. Fascinating! Curiously Heliamphora parva also has the largest flowers in the genus which is up to 80mm (rarely even more). A real stunner! (Maguire) S. McPherson, A. Fleischm, Wistuba & Nerz, 2011Selected clone. My best so far!Biggest lid of any clones I know!

From €75.00*
Short supply (FAQ)
Currently only 4 available
Heliamphora parva clone 08/02 x 08/02
Bold, large, red lids held upright over statuesque foliage give Heliamphora parva a striking appearance. Simply beautiful! H. parva was discovered during the initial ascent of the Neblina Massif in 1954, though it was at first considered a subspecies of H. neblinae (the name parva-small refers to its comparatively small size). Additional field studies conducted later revealed significant differences between the two, and in 2011 it was elevated to specific rank. Plants are found at elevations between 1750-2200m in open, upland meadows and clearings with Bonnetia scrub. Pitchers are upright, up to 35cm tall, and have a low to mid-height waist with a drainage hole. They are typically yellow or yellow-green. Sometimes the upper portion of the pitchers has faint red veins on the interior and/or red flashed exterior. A dense covering of small hairs is often present on the outside of the pitchers. A distinguishing feature of the species is its tendency to form a creeping stems up to 70cm long that scrambles over rocks and allow the plant to find new habitat. Very rarely, the stem can be erect. Dead pitchers remain on the stem and effectively collect water which slowly leaks down and allows the plant to survive drought and wildfires that sometimes sweep its habitat. Even if the lead growth is killed during these fires, the plant is usually able to re-sprout from the stem! Ants are also known to colonize the dead pitchers, and- in return for the shelter- protect the living parts by swarming them if they’re disturbed. They also appear able to regularly collect nectar from the spoon and yet rarely get trapped. Fascinating! Curiously Heliamphora parva also has the largest flowers in the genus which is up to 80mm (rarely even more). A real stunner! (Maguire) S. McPherson, A. Fleischm, Wistuba & Nerz, 2011Selected clone. My best so far!Biggest lid of any clones I know!

€75.00*
Short supply (FAQ)
Currently only 2 available
Heliamphora parva clone 08/08 (Cerro Neblina)
Bold, large, red lids held upright over statuesque foliage give Heliamphora parva a striking appearance. Simply beautiful! H. parva was discovered during the initial ascent of the Neblina Massif in 1954, though it was at first considered a subspecies of H. neblinae (the name parva-small refers to its comparatively small size). Additional field studies conducted later revealed significant differences between the two, and in 2011 it was elevated to specific rank. Plants are found at elevations between 1750-2200m in open, upland meadows and clearings with Bonnetia scrub. Pitchers are upright, up to 35cm tall, and have a low to mid-height waist with a drainage hole. They are typically yellow or yellow-green. Sometimes the upper portion of the pitchers has faint red veins on the interior and/or red flashed exterior. A dense covering of small hairs is often present on the outside of the pitchers. A distinguishing feature of the species is its tendency to form a creeping stems up to 70cm long that scrambles over rocks and allow the plant to find new habitat. Very rarely, the stem can be erect. Dead pitchers remain on the stem and effectively collect water which slowly leaks down and allows the plant to survive drought and wildfires that sometimes sweep its habitat. Even if the lead growth is killed during these fires, the plant is usually able to re-sprout from the stem! Ants are also known to colonize the dead pitchers, and- in return for the shelter- protect the living parts by swarming them if they’re disturbed. They also appear able to regularly collect nectar from the spoon and yet rarely get trapped. Fascinating! Curiously Heliamphora parva also has the largest flowers in the genus which is up to 80mm (rarely even more). A real stunner! (Maguire) S. McPherson, A. Fleischm, Wistuba & Nerz, 2011Selected clone. Very nice!

From €50.00*