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Nepenthes adrianii (Sumatra)
Nepenthes adrianii is often seen as a synonym of Nepenthes spathulata. Nevertheless, there are at least habitual differences between the two groups. Nepenthes adrianii usually shows a green pitcher body and a contrasting peristome, while N. spathulata is usually completely red colored. The form sold here shows a green-yellow basal body dotted with red spots, green serrated wings, and a beautiful dark red-purple peristome that shows its full width shortly after opening and then successively folds back, leaving a serrated peristome when the pitchers are fully formed.

€30.00*
Short supply (FAQ)
Nepenthes dubia (Gunugn Talamau, West Sumatra)
Nepenthes dubia is known from only two mountains: Mount Talakmau, West Sumatra (1800-2700m asl), and Gunung Malea, North Sumatra (1600m ñ 2200m asl). These plants are from the mountain on which the species was first discovered. The upper pitchers of this form (G. Talamau) always have an orange tint in my experience.Nepenthes dubia is a diminutive and dainty species known from only two peaks in the Barisan mountain range of Sumatra. N. dubia is found growing in mossy forests, either epiphytically at lower elevations, or terrestrially in moss clumps at high altitudes (2200m+) amongst the stunted alpine vegetation. It is a true highland plant, though faster growing than many other highlanders.The name ëdubiaí is latin for ìdoubtfulî referring itís similarity to N. inermis and initially being mistaken for a possible hybrid. Lower pitchers are rarely produced and relatively small, with the rosette stage being short lived. N. dubia quickly vines producing elegant and dainty upper pitchers (8cm). Pitchers are funnel shaped, with the lower part appearing as if pinched and flattened from either side. This creates a very unique and unusual look. While these pitchers strongly resemble those of N. inermis, they differ in having a well-developed peristome. The peristome is relatively (to the small pitcher size) broad and flat, lying horizontally so that the pitchers open upwards. The pitcher lid in N. dubia is also unique in almost always being bent backwards by more than 180 degrees relative to the pitcher opening. The upper pitchers of this species are generally light green to green-yellow in colour, though orange and red forms exist. Lower pitchers are often more colourful, being orange to red in colour. All pitchers produce especially viscous pitcher fluid similar to that found in N. inermis and a few other Sumatran species. This is hypothesized to enable pitchers to function as flypaper traps as well as typical pitfall traps. The characteristic red to purple tendrils found on the majority of plants are also a notable and interesting feature.Overall both plant and pitchers, while remaining small and elegant, possess lots of interesting detail and are incredibly unique and charming. Cultivation Guidelines:Light: Bright indirect or dappled lightTemperature: True highland conditions. Requires cool night time temperatures.Growing medium: An open, mossy but well-draining mix. A mix of high quality sphagnum moss with horticultural-grade perlite, a bit of good quality peat-moss and pine bark works well. The proportion of Sphagnum in the mix should ideally be quite high.Extra notes on Cultivation: Appreciates high humidity levels.

€60.00*
Short supply (FAQ)
Nepenthes inermis (Gunung Gadut, Sumatra)
This is my personal favourite species, with absolutely stunning and unique pitchers!!!Endemic to a number peaks in the Barisan Mountains of West Sumatra and Jambi, Nepenthes inermis grows (1500-2600m) either as an epiphyte in mossy forest or terrestrially amongst stunted montane scrub (>2000m). Despite being a true highland plant, N. inermis is a fairly quick and easy grower that rapidly vines from a young age. It is therefore highly recommended, both for specialists and newcomers with a basic understanding of how to cultivate highland nepenthes! Itís unique and beautiful upper pitchers really make it a ìmustî for any collection.Nepenthes inermis rarely produces lower pitchers; with the rosette stage being short lived. Lower pitchers are generally wingless and are mostly funnel shaped (infandibular), ballooning in the top third. They closely resemble the lower pitchers of N. dubia, but are distinctly constricted just below the almost horizontal peristome. Despite being very different to the upper pitchers, they are quite elegant and beautiful in their own right.This species is really known for its fantastic and completely unique upper pitchers! They in no way resemble the lower pitchers and have to be one of the best examples of pitcher dimorphism within the genus. These wide, infandibular pitchers (9cm) resemble bright electric green trumpets, almost completely lacking any peristome, a trait unique to only this species!!! This lack of any notable peristome is the origin of the name ëinermisí which is Latin for for "unarmed" .The pitcher mouth is round and generally horizontal, with a small, long pitcher lid doing little to keep out any rain. Fortunately, despite the fact that these pitchers often fill with water and are frequently tipped over due to the weight, extremely viscous pitcher fluid, as well as laterally appressed walls in the lower parts of the pitcher, keeps all pitcher contents within the pitcher, allowing water to drain and the pitchers to spring back to their original positions. Like other Sumatran species, this extremely viscous fluid may enable the upper pitchers to act as flypaper traps, as well as functioning as a lubricant to slide any trapped prey into the pitcher body. This fluid is so thick in fact that when poured, it can form a long stream several meters in length.Cultivation Guidelines:Light: Bright indirect or dappled light. Temperature: True highland conditions. Requires cool night time temperatures.Growing medium: An open, mossy but well-draining mix. A mix of high quality sphagnum moss with horticultural-grade Perlite, a bit of good quality peat-moss and pine bark works well. The proportion of Sphagnum in the mix should ideally be quite high.Extra notes on Cultivation: Appreciates high humidity levels.

From €50.00*
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Nepenthes adnata (Kelog Sembilan, Sumatra)
A simple, but nevertheless pretty small species from the intermediate highlands of Sumatra. A relatively dark pitcher body with a red-brownish reticulate pattern, a narrow, red-purple peristome and a very bright pitcher interior characterize this species. There are no known natural hybrids of Nepenthes adnata, although unfortunately many natural populations have already been destroyed. Further horticultural propagation and protection is very important!Successful reports of cultivation in lowland and highland setups are already known.Nepenthes adnata makes a nice addition to a windowsill or small growspace.

€20.00*
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Nepenthes aristolochioides (Sumatra)
Nepenthes aristolochioides is one of the most distinctive of all Nepenthes. While having an interesting history, it’s their gorgeous and uniquely shaped lantern-like pitchers that are the defining characteristic of this species, and which make them a ‘must have’ in every serious highland collection. Unfortunately this has also led to them being critically endangered due to over collecting in their natural habitat.Small (7cm) balloon-like pitchers are produced, that are a light creamy-yellow in colour, heavily mottled with reddish-brown to almost purple blotches. These domed pitchers have an unusual round front facing opening, which leads horizontally into the pitcher. The dark red-orange to purple-brown peristome curves inwards forming an “entrance tunnel”, and translucent ‘windows’ on the back of the pitcher allow sunlight to illuminate the interior of the pitcher, thereby luring in both collector and flying insects alike. These traps function similarly to the ‘lobsterpot’ style traps used by Darlingtonia californica (Cobra lilies). Nepenthes klossii is the only other Nepenthes known to do this. While the waxy surface zone inside the pitchers is notably absent in this species, very viscous, syrupy pitcher fluid similar to that used by N. inermis, ensures any unfortunate insects that make their way into the trap are literally glued to the inner pitcher surfaces. N. aristolochioides is a rapidly climbing species, with a short lived rosette stage, before plants rapidly vine, climbing high into the forest canopy. Vines can reach up to 8m in length with smaller rosettes being produced along older vines. Very little dimorphism is observed between upper and lower pitchers. Cultivation N. aristolochioides grows primarily terrestrially, but also as an epiphyte (rooted in mossy clumps), in high altitude Sphagnum-dominated mossy forests, As such this species needs cool night time temperatures, high humidity and an open, mossy, but well-draining substrate. A mix of high quality sphagnum moss with horticultural-grade Perlite, a bit of good quality peat-moss and pine bark works well. Interesting features and factsOne of the most unique and unusual pitcher shapes in the genus.In some ways reminiscent of the Aristolochia vines, from which this species gets its name.Native Range: Endemic to Sumatra, Indonesia.Altitudinal distribution: Highland, 1800–2500 m.Light: Bright indirect or dappled lightTemperature: Requires cool night time temperatures typical of true highlanders.Soil: An open, mossy but well-draining mix.Extra notes on Cultivation: Appreciates high humidity levels.

From €50.00*
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Nepenthes bongso (Gunung Merapi, Sumatra)
Nepenthes bongso is a great species for lovers of black pitchers. The plants offered here correspond to the typical picture of this species. This species is common in Sumatra at 1000-2700 m.a.s.l.. The pitchers open mostly yellow-orange and then change successively into a black color.N. bongso produces cup-shaped pitchers with a large, broad peristome that is black and ribbed. The upper pitchers are funnel-shaped and unexpectedly bright in relation to the lower pitchers; they can be almost white, which is a particularly nice contrast. The leaves are slightly peltate.Great, robust species, which usually makes little problems in the attitude, but has much to offer!

From €15.00*
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Nepenthes carunculata (G. Sago)
There is disagreement about the status of Nepenthes carunculata as a separate species or yet as a heterotypic synonym of N. bongso. However, the plants offered here are clearly different from the plants offered as N. bongso. The N. carunculata have more red color. The pitchers are cup-shaped with a thickened base, two parallel wings, and a fluted peristome in dark red. The upper pitchers of N. carunculata are very bright and infindibular, thus showing a strong dimorphism to the dark bottom pitchers. Pretty, rarely kept species.

From €15.00*
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Nepenthes carunculata var. robusta (Gunung Gadut)
A special variety of Nepenthes bongso/carunculata. The variety robusta shows clearly broader leaves, a strongly thickened tendril, as well as a broader peristome. A beautiful variety with dark, almost black pitcher and peristome and peltate pitcher base. Here every lover of black pitchers gets his money's worth. Interesting is the contrast between the dark lower pitchers and the bright, almost white upper pitchers.

€40.00*
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Nepenthes densiflora (Sumatra)
Only known from high mountains of the Alas Valley and Goh Lembuh massif in Aceh province, Northern Sumatra, N. densiflora is an extreme highland plant that prefers higher altitudes within its range (1700-3200m). It grows in mossy forest, and at higher altitude often in direct sunlight between stunted montane scrub. This is generally a slow to medium, but steady grower.Deeply coloured lower pitchers are a crimson-red to a maroon-brown colour, with colour extending up the tendrils. These pitchers are large, tough and long-lasting, creating a really stunning display. The flared and very toothy red peristome, sometimes striped with even darker red, resembles both N. singalana and N. diatas, though the prominent ridges present in these species are notable absent. Prominent wings run down the length of the pitchers.Upper pitchers are generally lighter in colour, ranging from a plain creamy green-yellow to being tinged and/or speckled in rosy red hues, often with a pale interior. The peristome is tinged or striped with varying degrees of reds or oranges.Cultivation Guidelines:Light: Bright indirect or dappled light. Often grows in direct sunlight at high altitudes.Temperature: An extreme highlander, definite requirement for highland conditions. Day temperatures should not be allowed to rise too high, and cool night time temperatures are a definite requirement.Growing medium: An open, mossy but well-draining mix. A mix of high quality sphagnum moss with horticultural-grade perlite, a bit of good quality peat-moss and pine bark works well. Extra notes on Cultivation: Not difficult as long as the right climate is provided. Appreciates high humidity levels.

From €30.00*
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Nepenthes diatas (Bandahara)
Nepenthes diatas is a very beautiful and rare ‘ultra-highland’ (2400-2600m) species endemic to Sumatra. Its name ‘diatas’ is Indonesian for “above” or “on top” in reference to it being found primarily on exposed summit ridges where plants are often very stunted, and carry only one pitcher at a time. Plants found at lower altitudes tend to be larger. Despite this it is a fairly typical highland plant and not difficult to grow provided the right climate is provided. Cool nights are a must. This is an extremely rewarding species.Closely related to N. singalana and N. spathulata, N. diatas produces bold and remarkable pitchers that range from orange-browns to a deep purple-red or maroon, often being most dark and red when exposed to strong light. The striking peristome has prominent teeth, and ranges from pink-red to the same deep maroon as the pitchers, at times with darker striping. This creates a strong contrast with the creamy white pitcher interior, which can be flecked with the same purples as the pitcher body. This is an incredibly beautiful and sturdy plant, with bold traps and thick rugged leaves, perfect for life on a summit ridge; be it in your greenhouse or high in the mountains of Aceh province.Cultivation Guidelines:Light: Bright indirect or dappled light. Seems tolerant of high light levels provided temperatures remain cool.Temperature: Highland to ‘ultra-highland’ conditions. Requires cool days and chilly night to thrive.Growing medium: An open, mossy but well-draining mix. A mix of high quality sphagnum moss with horticultural-grade perlite, a bit of good quality peat-moss and pine bark works well. The proportion of Sphagnum in the mix should ideally be quite high.Extra notes on Cultivation: Appreciates high humidity levels.

€25.00*
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Nepenthes dubia (Malea, Sumatra)
Nepenthes dubia is known from only two mountains: Mount Talakmau, West Sumatra (1800-2700m asl), and Gunung Malea, North Sumatra (1600m - 2200m asl). These plants are from the second and more recently discovered location. The lower pitchers of this variety are reddish, and often quite dark. Young plants are much more colorful than comparable plants from G. Talamau. The upper pitchers on this form are pure yellow or yellowish green, as opposed to the more orange uppers from G. Talamau. Intermediate pitchers are often striped.Nepenthes dubia is a diminutive and dainty species known from only two peaks in the Barisan mountain range of Sumatra. N. dubia is found growing in mossy forests, either epiphytically at lower elevations, or terrestrially in moss clumps at high altitudes (2200m+) amongst the stunted alpine vegetation. It is a true highland plant, though faster growing than many other highlanders.The name ëdubiaí is latin for ìdoubtfulî referring itís similarity to N. inermis and initially being mistaken for a possible hybrid. Lower pitchers are rarely produced and relatively small, with the rosette stage being short lived. N. dubia quickly vines producing elegant and dainty upper pitchers (8cm). Pitchers are funnel shaped, with the lower part appearing as if pinched and flattened from either side. This creates a very unique and unusual look. While these pitchers strongly resemble those of N. inermis, they differ in having a well-developed peristome. The peristome is relatively (to the small pitcher size) broad and flat, lying horizontally so that the pitchers open upwards. The pitcher lid in N. dubia is also unique in almost always being bent backwards by more than 180 degrees relative to the pitcher opening. The upper pitchers of this species are generally light green to green-yellow in colour, though orange and red forms exist. Lower pitchers are often more colourful, being orange to red in colour. All pitchers produce especially viscous pitcher fluid similar to that found in N. inermis and a few other Sumatran species. This is hypothesized to enable pitchers to function as flypaper traps as well as typical pitfall traps. The characteristic red to purple tendrils found on the majority of plants are also a notable and interesting feature.Overall both plant and pitchers, while remaining small and elegant, possess lots of interesting detail and are incredibly unique and charming. Cultivation Guidelines:Light: Bright indirect or dappled lightTemperature: True highland conditions. Requires cool night time temperatures.Growing medium: An open, mossy but well-draining mix. A mix of high quality sphagnum moss with horticultural-grade perlite, a bit of good quality peat-moss and pine bark works well. The proportion of Sphagnum in the mix should ideally be quite high.Extra notes on Cultivation: Appreciates high humidity levels.

From €40.00*
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Nepenthes eustachya (K. Sembilan, Sumatra)
A litophytic species from North Sumatra. The wide altitudinal occurrence from 0-1600 m.a.s.l. allows the species to be successfully maintained under various conditions.The earlier classification under N. alata is particularly evident in the similar lower pitchers. The upper pitchers, however, are clearly distinguished, by the more angular appearance with the rounded base below the hip of the pitcher.Most Nepenthes eustachya show a contrasting red-green coloured peristome and a red or pale, almost whitish pitcher body. The clones sold here show an intense red ground colour. Often underestimated, attractive species.

€15.00*
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Nepenthes flava (Sumatra)
Nepenthes flava is a relatively new species (2007) and an incredibly spectacular plant endemic to the high altitude (1800 ñ 2200m) montane forests of the Barisan Mountains, Northern Sumatra. They are found growing terrestrially in more open areas of the forest. As the name ëflavaí suggests, this species produces bright yellow-green upper pitchers. Furthermore the yellow-green leaves can give the whole plant a yellow appearance. Upper pitchers can be upto 6cm in height and start off as a narrow tube leading upto a broad rounded funnel, resembling a small green toilet bowl. The peristome is almost horizontal, opening upwards with a wavy outer margin, and although usually the same yellow colour as the pitchers it can be either striped or wholly red. The robust, squat lower pitchers are very similar to the upper pitchers, but range from yellow, through orange and red, to possibly even purple in colour. Their wide peristome is usually darker in colour, with lower pitchers resembling N. jacquilineae but with a larger lid and less pronounced peristome. All pitchers produce especially viscous, syrupy pitcher fluid similar to that used by N. inermis and a few other Sumatran species. This helps pitchers function as flypaper traps as opposed to only pitfall traps, and helps upper pitchers contend with wind movement. Some plants also have stunning red stems. Cultivation Guidelines:Light: Bright indirect or dappled lightTemperature: True highland conditions. Requires cool night time temperatures.Growing medium: An open, mossy but well-draining mix. A mix of high quality sphagnum moss with horticultural-grade perlite, a bit of good quality peat-moss and pine bark works well.Extra notes on Cultivation: Appreciates high humidity levels.

From €20.00*
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Nepenthes izumiae (Barisan, Sumatra)
A very dark species from the Barisan Mountains in Sumatra, often producing pitch black pitchers. There the species is found at 1700-1900 m.a.s.l. and grows primarily epiphytic. The pitchers are reminiscent of those of N. singalana (primarily the Belirang form) and Nepenthes lingulata, to both of which it is also more closely related. What is unique to N. izumiae, however, are the teeth on the posterior part of the peristome, near the base of the lid, which can become surprisingly long depending on the individual.The broad peristome is fluted, the pitcher hourglass-shaped and slender. The pitcher lid is usually undulating. Like N. lingulata N. izumiae has a distinct appendage on the underside of the lid, but it is rather short and broad.Very nice species for lovers of black Nepenthes cans.

€30.00*
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Nepenthes jacquelinae (West Sumatra)
Nepenthes jacquelineae has to be one of the most beautiful and unique species of nepenthes on account of its squat, robust pitchers that have one of the most spectacular and distinctive peristomes of the genus. Endemic to the Barisan Mountains of West Sumatra, N. jacquilineae grows primarily as an epiphyte, but also occasionally terrestrially, in high altitude (1700-2200m) dense most forest. These forests are almost constantly enveloped in fog and experience daily rainfall, remaining cool and moist. It is a true highland plant. It is otherwise a relatively hardy and easy grower, provided the correct climate is provided.N. jacquelineae produces relatively small (= 6cm) lower pitchers. These are squat, funnel-shaped (infundibular), rounding towards the top, and possess a wide, flattened peristome (upto 1cm wide), that resembles a pair of flattened lipsticked lips. Upper pitchers are produced on vines up to 5m in length, and are much larger than their lower counterparts. They are robust and squat, being up to 15cm high and 10cm wide, lacking any wings that may have been present in the lowers. The most characteristic feature of N. jacquelineae however is its greatly expanded peristome, which can be up to 3.5 cm wide in upper pitchers. It is unusually smooth. While pitchers are reminiscent of a robust form of the related N. jamban but with a greatly expanded peristome, only the unrelated N. platychila (Borneo) produces a similar peristome structure. While N. platychila may have the stripes, N. jacquelineae definitely wins any competitions for colour. Pitchers range in colour from green, through yellow and oranges, to fully red, and may be lightly speckled. Peristomes are usually an orange to deep red colour. While a green pitcher, with red peristome is most common, exceptional individuals can even produce dark fully maroon-purple pitchers. The flared horizontal disk-like peristomes characteristic of this species may act as a landing platform for flying insects, the primary prey caught by the upper pitchers. Especially viscous, syrupy pitcher fluid similar to that found in N. inermis and a few other Sumatran species, coats the pitcher walls. This is hypothesized to enable pitchers to function as flypaper traps as well as typical pitfall traps. The species was discovered by Charles Clarke and Troy Davis. The name ëjacquelineaeí is in honour of Charles Clarke's wife, Jacqueline Clarke, while N. izumeae (discovered on the same trip) is named after of Izumi Davis, Troyís wife.Cultivation Guidelines:Light: Bright indirect or dappled light. Naturally grows in relatively low light, as sunlight is diffused by fog and forest.Temperature: True highland conditions. Requires cool night time temperatures, and moderate daytime temperatures.Growing medium: An open, mossy but well-draining mix. A mix of high quality sphagnum moss with horticultural-grade perlite, a bit of good quality peat-moss and pine bark works well. The proportion of Sphagnum in the mix should ideally be quite high.Extra notes on Cultivation: Endemic to forests almost constantly enveloped in fog, this species appreciates cool, moist conditions and very high humidity.

From €40.00*
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Nepenthes jacquelinae (West Sumatra)
Nepenthes jacquelineae has to be one of the most beautiful and unique species of nepenthes on account of its squat, robust pitchers that have one of the most spectacular and distinctive peristomes of the genus. Endemic to the Barisan Mountains of West Sumatra, N. jacquilineae grows primarily as an epiphyte, but also occasionally terrestrially, in high altitude (1700-2200m) dense most forest. These forests are almost constantly enveloped in fog and experience daily rainfall, remaining cool and moist. It is a true highland plant. It is otherwise a relatively hardy and easy grower, provided the correct climate is provided.N. jacquelineae produces relatively small (= 6cm) lower pitchers. These are squat, funnel-shaped (infundibular), rounding towards the top, and possess a wide, flattened peristome (upto 1cm wide), that resembles a pair of flattened lipsticked lips. Upper pitchers are produced on vines up to 5m in length, and are much larger than their lower counterparts. They are robust and squat, being up to 15cm high and 10cm wide, lacking any wings that may have been present in the lowers. The most characteristic feature of N. jacquelineae however is its greatly expanded peristome, which can be up to 3.5 cm wide in upper pitchers. It is unusually smooth. While pitchers are reminiscent of a robust form of the related N. jamban but with a greatly expanded peristome, only the unrelated N. platychila (Borneo) produces a similar peristome structure. While N. platychila may have the stripes, N. jacquelineae definitely wins any competitions for colour. Pitchers range in colour from green, through yellow and oranges, to fully red, and may be lightly speckled. Peristomes are usually an orange to deep red colour. While a green pitcher, with red peristome is most common, exceptional individuals can even produce dark fully maroon-purple pitchers. The flared horizontal disk-like peristomes characteristic of this species may act as a landing platform for flying insects, the primary prey caught by the upper pitchers. Especially viscous, syrupy pitcher fluid similar to that found in N. inermis and a few other Sumatran species, coats the pitcher walls. This is hypothesized to enable pitchers to function as flypaper traps as well as typical pitfall traps. The species was discovered by Charles Clarke and Troy Davis. The name ëjacquelineaeí is in honour of Charles Clarke's wife, Jacqueline Clarke, while N. izumeae (discovered on the same trip) is named after of Izumi Davis, Troyís wife.Cultivation Guidelines:Light: Bright indirect or dappled light. Naturally grows in relatively low light, as sunlight is diffused by fog and forest.Temperature: True highland conditions. Requires cool night time temperatures, and moderate daytime temperatures.Growing medium: An open, mossy but well-draining mix. A mix of high quality sphagnum moss with horticultural-grade perlite, a bit of good quality peat-moss and pine bark works well. The proportion of Sphagnum in the mix should ideally be quite high.Extra notes on Cultivation: Endemic to forests almost constantly enveloped in fog, this species appreciates cool, moist conditions and very high humidity.

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Nepenthes jamban (Sumatra)
Nepenthes jamban is endemic to the Barisan Mountains of North Sumatra, where it is known only from its type locality. This species is only found growing terrestrially at altitudes of 1800-2100m, either in upper montane mossy forest or at higher altitudes amongst stunted montane scrub. It is therefore a typical highland plant, and is a relatively easy and moderate grower, that tends to get quite viney. The name "jamban" is Indonesian for "toilet" in reference to its famously ítoilet-bowlí shaped pitchers.Nepenthes jamban produces small (5.8cm) lower pitchers that start off as a narrow funnel shape, opening to a wide funnel and an almost horizontal pitcher opening. They range in colour from pale yellow or orange to a vibrant red without, some with darker speckling. In many ways lower pitchers resemble those of N. flava but without the wavy peristome margins.The real attraction however is the amazing and characteristic upper pitchers! These large (12cm) distinctive toilet shaped pitchers have a flat uniform peristome running the full circumference of the circular and horizontal pitcher opening. Upper pitchers are generally bright lime-green to yellow, with an orange peristome, and can be speckled in orange-red on the inner pitcher surface. The inner surface is wholly glandular and functions as a fly paper trap, as well as a typical pitfall trap, thanks to strong viscous pitcher fluid, similar to that found in other Sumatran species. This may aid in the capture of larger prey as is often found in these pitchers, which are also notably home to large populations of pitcher infauna. These upper pitchers are produced on a characteristically purplish-red stem that grows up to 4m in length.This unique and iconic "toilet-bowl" species is a much have in any highland collection.Cultivation Guidelines:Light: Bright indirect or dappled light. Temperature: True highland conditions. Requires cool night time temperatures.Growing medium: An open, mossy but well-draining mix. A mix of high quality sphagnum moss with horticultural-grade perlite, a bit of good quality peat-moss and pine bark works well. The proportion of Sphagnum in the mix should ideally be quite high.Extra notes on Cultivation: Appreciates high humidity levels.

€80.00*
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Nepenthes lavicola (Telong)
Often underestimated species from the Geureudong massif in North Sumatra from 2000-2600 m.a.s.l. It is thought to be closely related to N. spectabilis."Lavicola" means "lava-dwelling" and comes from the fact that the massif is a stratovolcano and the species grows on solidified lava. Nepenthes lavicola forms very dark, mottled pitchers and a bright yellow peristome contrasting strongly with them, usually with red stripes on the peristome. The upper pitchers correspond largely to the lowers.With sufficient night temperature drop an interesting addition to the collection in any case.

From €15.00*
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Nepenthes mikei
Arguable one of the most dainty and beautiful of the small Nepenthes species, Nepenthes mikei is an amazing deminutive highland species endemic to the Indonesian island of Sumatra, where it is recorded as being from only two locations: Mount Pangulubao in North Sumatra and Mount Bandahara in Aceh. Other locations are undisclosed for conservation purposes. They grow exclusively terrestrially in lower and upper montane mossy forest, as well as amongst stunted summit scrub (1100-2800m), often in open and exposed sites.Almost everything about this species is small and delicate, from the leaves, to the stems and of course the pitchers. Small does not mean they can’t make a bold statement however! Lower pitchers (max 12cm) are slightly rounded near the base, but are mostly cylindrical, opening up in a slight funnel towards the pitcher opening. What really makes the pitchers stand out however is their exquisite coloration and detail. Their tiny pitchers are so darkly coloured that they appear black, and contrast so strongly with their strikingly bright yellow-green speckling , the fully pale green interior (occasionally with eyespots) and the very thin bright yellow-green peristome that rings the pitcher opening. They really are a sight to behold. In lower pitchers, dark frilled wings run down the front of the pitcher body, with the inward facing side of each frill often being the same shocking green as the flecks and peristome. This species rapidly transitions from a rosette to a climbing vine up to 7m in length. Upper pitchers are similar (8cm), though smaller than the lower pitchers, and wings are reduced to ribs running down the front of each pitcher. They are more delicate and the peristome can take on a reddish tint. In bright light the red stems and tendrils can darken to a deep purple. This whole plant can really put on a display, especially when healthy vines are covered in dozens and dozens of striking little, elegant pitchersCultivation Guidelines:Light: Bright indirect or dappled light. Often grows in open sites where it is exposed to direct sunlight. Seems tolerant of high light levels provided temperatures remain cool. Temperature: True highland conditions. Requires cool night time temperatures.Growing medium: An open, mossy but well-draining mix. A mix of high quality sphagnum moss with horticultural-grade perlite, a bit of good quality peat-moss and pine bark works well. The proportion of Sphagnum in the mix should ideally be quite high.Extra notes on Cultivation: Appreciates high humidity levels.

From €30.00*
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Nepenthes ovata (Pangulubao, Sumatra)
Nepenthes ovata is a stunning species endemic to a number of mountains in North Sumatra, particularly around Lake Toba. It grows at altitudes of 1700-2100m either terrestrially or as an epiphyte in mossy forest or stunted summit scrub, often in association with sphagnum moss. These plants are from Mount Pangulubao, where the holotype (type specimen used to describe the species) was collected, although it had been previously discovered on another mountain. Plants found in this location typically grow terrestrially. This species is a highland plant, and an easy grower provided the right conditions are met.Arguably one of the most beautiful species, and famous for its incredibly flared peristome, N. ovata produces large (25cm) generally ovoid (egg shaped) pitchers from which it gains its name. These short and tubby pitchers, lined with a pair of fringed wings, range from green, through hues of orange and rich red, to purple-maroon in colour. What really makes the pitchers stand out however are their long necks and huge, very broad flared peristomes. The dark red or purple peristomes, sometimes with darker striping, are prominently ridged, the outer edge often wavy, and the inner margin lined with a series of teeth. These teeth are most prominent under the lid where they point forward in a wicked display. The distinguishing feature of the species however is a glandular “hook” on the underside of the lid. Upper pitchers (20cm) are reminiscent of the lowers, but more restrained and drawn out into a long funnel shape, like an elegant wineglass. Wings are absent, the neck shortened, the peristome reduced and smaller, less prominent teeth line the peristome. These pitchers are nevertheless beautiful in their own right; the bright red striping on the peristome creating a striking contrast with the rest of the pitcher, a yellowish-green colour (often getting more yellow towards the peristome).Cultivation Guidelines:Light: Bright indirect or dappled light. Temperature: True highland conditions. Requires cool night time temperatures.Growing medium: An open, mossy but well-draining mix. A mix of high quality sphagnum moss with horticultural-grade perlite, a bit of good quality peat-moss and pine bark works well. The proportion of Sphagnum in the mix should ideally be quite high.Extra notes on Cultivation: Appreciates high humidity levels.

From €25.00*
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Nepenthes reinwardtiana (Sumatra)
Typical green form of Nepenthes reinwardtiana from Sumatra. Due to the large distribution both in height and area, this species is very adaptable. It occurs at altitudes from 0-2200 m.a.s.l.! This adaptability makes this species a perfect candidate for hobbyists gaining their first experience in the genus. Characteristic for this species are the distinctive paired eyespots in the inside of the pitcher. Otherwise, the pitchers are strongly hourglass-shaped with particularly slender, elegant high pitchers. The species also has a strongly reduced peristome.

€15.00*
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Nepenthes rhombicaulis (Gunung Pangulubao)
Pretty species with unusual ecology, endemic to Sumatra. Unlike many other Nepenthes species, Nepenthes rhombicaulis occurs underground in the forest and often pitchers or parts of the plants are partially to completely covered by detritus and moss. Pitchers that grow buried are reported to grow significantly larger than free-standing pitchers. Bruce Salmon hypothesized that this species thus specialized in capturing subterranean insects. Under regular highland conditions with night temperature drop, the species is unproblematic to keep, especially the low light requirement. The pitchers are often cup-shaped with an oval, broad peristome and usually in shades of green, brown or red.

From €10.00*
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Nepenthes singalana (Sumatra)
Named after Mount Singgalang, a volcano in West Sumatra, Nepenthes singalana is a beautiful and toothy highland plant from the highlands of western Sumatra. It is endemic to and widespread throughout the Barisan range, growing at altitudes of 2000-2900m. This is an easy and typical, moderate to slow growing highlander, which leans towards favouring ëultra-highlandí conditions.Nepenthes singalana is a magnificent species which in many ways combines some of the most desirable pitcher traits, in a single stunning species: slender pitchers, dark colouration, a beautiful flared peristome and prominent, wicked looking teeth. Pitchers can be considered medium to large sized (15cm+), are long, slender and roughly cylindrical in appearance, ranging from green, speckled with red and purples, to pitchers that are almost fully red or purple in colouration. Lower pitchers are generally larger than uppers, and have prominent wings running down the full pitcher length. Peristome structure varies, but is generally wide and flared ranging from a bright orange-red to deep purple, depending on lighting, genetics and pitcher age. Prominent teeth line the inner peristome margin, which rotates to leave the largest and wickedest looking teeth forward as they line the neck of the peristome leading up to the large oval pitcher lid. One of the best features of this species is that pitchers retain and display their most attractive features even when small. Cultivation Guidelines:Light: Bright indirect or dappled light. Seems to appreciate brighter light than some other species.Temperature: True highland conditions. Requires cool night time temperatures.Growing medium: An open, mossy but well-draining mix. A mix of high quality sphagnum moss with horticultural-grade perlite, a bit of good quality peat-moss and pine bark works well. The proportion of Sphagnum in the mix should ideally be quite high.Extra notes on Cultivation: Appreciates high humidity levels.

€30.00*
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Nepenthes spathulata
Nepenthes spathulata is an impressive and easy growing species from the southern regions of the Barisan Mountains, Sumatra, as well as the island of Java. It naturally grows at a variety of altitudes (1100-2900m), either in mossy or lower montane forest as an epiphyte, or higher up in upper montane forest or stunted summit scrub terrestrially. Due to this wide altitudinal distribution it is one of the easier highlanders and can be grown under more ‘intermediate’ conditions. Definitely one of the ‘Classics’.The lower pitchers of N. spathulata reach an impressive size (30cm) and are some of the largest produced by any Sumatran species. They are generally egg-shaped, becoming narrower and more cylindrical leading up to the peristome, often with a well-defined hip. The pitcher body is usually a vivid light-green colour, under and in stark contrast to the stunning and beautifully flared bright-red to dark purple-black peristome. The inner margin of the peristome is lined with short but distinct teeth. The pitcher interior is generally paler and speckled with pale purple-red blotches. A prominent pair of frilled wings runs down the front of the lower pitchers. Upper pitchers are less frequently produced, but closely resemble smaller (15cm), wingless versions of the lower pitchers, often with a thinner and possibly more wavy peristome.Plants from Java were initially informally referred to as N. ‘adrianii’. This is now considered a heterotypic synonym for N. spathulata, and these plants all considered to be one species. The Javan plants are however generally more colourful, with redder pitchers and a yellow, orange, to red peristome. In my opinion, they lack the striking contrast of the Sumatran form however. Cultivation Guidelines:Light: Bright indirect or dappled light. Temperature: True highland conditions. Requires cool night time temperatures. May be grown under slightly warmer and more ‘intermediate’ conditions.Growing medium: An open, mossy but well-draining mix. A mix of high quality sphagnum moss with horticultural-grade perlite, a bit of good quality peat-moss and pine bark works well. The proportion of Sphagnum in the mix should ideally be quite high.Extra notes on Cultivation: Appreciates high humidity levels.

€25.00*